Albert Weisgerber

Illustrations by Albert Weisgerber for Jugend, ca. 1903–1913



1905


For the past months I've been slowly scrolling through decades of issues of Jugend, the Munich-based magazine which gave Jugendstil its name. Issues after 1910 haven't been OCR'd/indexed so you really just have to dig. John Coulthart has been unearthing gems from the archives for a few years.


Repeating the text from my post on Weisgerber's Grimm: The painter Albert Weisgerber (1878–1915) worked alongside a group of art titans in Munich before being killed in World War I. From a bio at Ketterer Kunst:

He studied at the "Akademie der Bildenden Künste" from 1897 to 1901, first under Gabriel Hackl, then under Franz von Stuck. He began working for the journal "Jugend" in 1897. Albert Weisgerber met Hans Purrmann, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Willi Geiger and Gino Finetti in Stuck's painting class in 1898, the same year in which he founded "Sturmfackel", an association with members such as Alfred Kubin, Rudolf Levy and Alfred Lörcher.
[...]
His work for the journal 'Jugend' took him to Paris a couple of times during 1905 to 1907, where he met Henri Matisse. His painting style was strongly influenced by Cézanne, Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec and Greco.
[...]
He was a founding member and the president of the Neue Münchener Secession in 1913, which had members such as Alexej von Jawlensky, Paul Klee, Alexander Kanoldt and others. Weisgerber saw the first exhibition of the Neue Münchener Secession shortly before being drafted into the war in Autumn 1914. He was killed one year later in the war.


Another art magazine, Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration, published an appreciation of Weisgerber after his death.




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Previously: Nineteen Hundred and Grimm